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    1. Link to Class Activities Day 1 Fall 2022
    1. Class Activities Week 2 - group work
    2. Class Activities Week 4
  1. Roster 
    1. Twitter Feeds for authors we are reading
    2. Tufekci et al (Sept 2022)
  2. Links to Sites and Tools We May Use in Class
  3. Public Thinking and the Challenges of New Media 
  4. Public Thinking & Memory Arts
    1. More Examples of Public Thinking
  5. Kassorla, Havelock, Young & Sullivan  
  6. Thompson & Boyd
  7. Deconstructing Digital Natives
  8. Trolling, Doxxing, Politics and Propaganda
    1. Ads and tweets for analysis
    2. Background 
    3. Marwick, Pariser, Phillips, and Steinem 
  9. Varieties of Social Media Activism
  10. Steinem & Einstein 
    1. Phillips
  11. Books for Review
  12. Boyd and the Issue of Critical Digital Literacy 
    1. Background on Boyd & her book
    2. Videos of Boyd and other Writers discussing Digital Natives
  13. Alt Right & AntiFa: Rhetorical Self Fashioning Online
  14. Fake News Redux
    1. 2016 Stanford Study of News Evaluation
    2. More Fake News Controversies Emerge - Pizzagate
    3. Sample Filter Bubble on Pizzagate - video vs. print
  15. Fake News and the Challenge to Critical Digital Literacy
  16. Post Election Discussion - Has Social Media Changed Politics?
    1. Election Rhetoric & Social Media
    2. Videos and Articles on Election and Social Media News Sites
    3. Do there Need to be Dramatic Changes to the Way Facebook & Social Media Operate?
    4. Gladwell, Shirky, Morozov
  17. Winner, Watters, Kassorla
    1. Project Resources
  18. Tools 
  19. Discussion Questions - Young & Sullivan
  20. CDL Links and Exercises Day 1
    1. Quiz 1
    2. Quiz 2
    3. Quiz 3
    4. Some Search Concerns
  21. Provisional Framework for Critical Digital Literacy
  22. Political Rhetoric, Demagoguery, and New  Media 
  23. "Micro" Social Networks
  24. Goffman & Gender
  25. Using Jhally/Goffman to Examine Magazines and Sites

 

 

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to Class Activities Day 1 Fall 2022

 

Class Activities Week 2 - group work

 

Class Activities Week 4

  1. Handout and exercises - warm up, Sundiata, Iliad excerpt, the linguistics of speech/writing,etc.  
  2. Powerpoint on Ong, orality and literacy' audio clip of Kindergartner using oral formulas to remember written forms. 

 

Roster 

 

 

Twitter Feeds for authors we are reading

  1. the class twitter account: rws4111 (note extra "1." This exists to follow the authors in the class)
  2. Clive Thompson
  3. Zeynep Tufecki 
  4. Roger McNamee 
  5. Katy Waldman 
  6. Tristan Harris 
  7. Dana Boyd 

 

 

Tufekci et al (Sept 2022)

 

Links to Sites and Tools We May Use in Class

 

Public Thinking and the Challenges of New Media 

 

 

Public Thinking & Memory Arts

 

Examples of Public Thinking
http://clivethompson.net/category/public-thinking/ How cloud enthusiasts used public thinking to discover a new cloud. Another thing – we can read Thompson's blog, twitter, etc., and
interact with the author in new ways. See comments: http://clivethompson.net/2016/05/05/how-to-discover-a-new-type-of-cloud/#comments He writes back more than his readers.

 

The art of memory seems to have become fashionable once more. Perhaps this is due to A) the anxiety of so much information, and B) as we are more aware of the past in a time of transition.

http://mt.artofmemory.com/  

Memory Forum sections about memory.

Music, memory and "Ear Worms" Which movie scores stick to the ear? Star Wars vs Marvell. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vfqkvwW2fs&sns=em 

 

Clive Thompson on his workflow and use of writing tools – connects to discussions of new memory arts/invention and retrieval and networked collaboration

http://lifehacker.com/im-clive-thompson-and-this-is-how-i-work-479520206

 

Academic workflow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qKDHQm145s


Show reddit on learning language https://www.reddit.com/r/learnspanish/comments/3hfwou/daily_practice_routine_megathread/

Scrivener and Evernote http://www.writehacked.com/writing/using-scrivener-and-evernote-to-write-your-book/

 

 

More Examples of Public Thinking

Thompson talks about the importance of “public thinking” and “networked” reading and writing of texts. At the end of his chapter he asks, “What tools will create new forms of public thinking in the years to come?” His answer is that “as more forms of media become digital, they'll become sites for public thinking… Marginalia may become a new type of public thinking, with the smartest remarks from other readers becoming part of how we make sense of a book.” Thompson also discusses how reading and writing are becoming “blended,” and quotes literacy theorist Debbie Brandt: “People read in order to generate writing; we read from the posture of the writer.”


We can examine some contemporary examples of tools and publishing experiments that embody Thompson's ideas. These may help us understand what Thompson is on about, but also determine the extent to which his claims are plausible.

  • Hypothesis is an example of a wave of new tools and experiments with social reading and writing. It enables people to publicly comment on and annotate online texts, and also lets you form groups, and follow people whose annotations you like. Example: if you look at Carr’s “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” you’ll see scholars have recorded their response in the margins. (You will need to have added the extension to see this). Political speeches are starting to be publicly annotated by academics. For example, the sociologist Tressie McMillan Cottom annotated Michelle Obama’s speech at the Democratic national Convention using Hypothesis.

 

  • The annotation tools “News Genius” and “Rap Genius” let users comment on, explicate, analyze and annotate news stories and music lyrics. Rap genius is used a lot and may be of interest to students.  Consider the following: T. S. Eliot's The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock has been nicely annotated. The line “Do I dare disturb the universe” is discussed, along with the fact that the line was remixed and used by rapper Chuck D. http://genius.com/Ts-eliot-the-love-song-of-j-alfred-prufrock-annotated If you click on the line the link to Chuck D will appear.   

    The Genius annotation system is used for fan fiction, creative writers, and many genres of "high" and pop culture.  The literature page is here: http://lit.genius.com/ Consider this annotation of Shelley's "Ozymandias". Note also that users vote on which annotations should be listed at the top, and there is a scoreboard of most popular writers and annotators.  Note also that while fans annotate pop songs, some artists annotate their own songs. Consider the recent hit "Broccoli," by D.R.A.M., which is annotated by the songwriters. Other writers and artists who have annotated texts are here  (you can follow them).

 

 

 

  • There are many scholarly tools for annotating texts. Some have been developed by writing faculty. For example there is MIT's Annotation Studio, and CMU's Classroom Salo
  • MEDIUM: The magazine platform Medium enables readers to comment on and annotate articles, follow writers and annotators, and reply to comments/annotations. many of the authors we are reading have Medium pages. For example, here is Clive Thompson's Medium postings. Another person we are reading is Dana Boyd, who has a page on Medium. You can see all the articles she has written and also the notes she has made, and you can follow both. 

 

 

Kassorla, Havelock, Young & Sullivan  

 

Thompson & Boyd

 

Deconstructing Digital Natives

  • Marc Prensky (often credited with coining the term “digital natives”) explains digital natives to PBS interviewer on Frontline https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGQLTHyRG_g
  • Two talks that show how widespread the terms “digital natives” and digital immigrants” are. 
    TED: "Digital natives vs. digital immigrants." Sree Sreenivasan.  "Advertisers, marketers, and employers chase digital natives, who are supposedly fearless in their love and embrace of technology. But there’s a group we’re overlooking, says Sree Sreenivasan, and that’s digital immigrants. In a short, charming talk he makes the case for skepticism and perspective from an older generation."
  • "The challenges of raising a digital native" shows existence and popularity of the term ‘digital native’)
  • Do "Digital Natives" Exist? Idea Channel, PBS Digital Studios. Fun entertaining video that echoes many of Boyd’s claims. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WVKBAqjHiE 
  • “On Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives: How the Digital Divide Affects Families, Educational Institutions, and the Workplace.” http://www.zurinstitute.com/digital_divide.html (This accepts the category but qualifies it by creating many distinctions and sub-categories.)

 

 

Trolling, Doxxing, Politics and Propaganda

November 1, 2017, the House Intelligence Committee released a few of the 3,000 political ads published by one troll farm linked to the Russian
government between 2015 and 2017. They also identified two popular twitter users named Jenna Abrams and Pamela Moore, as Russian
trolls.  They were some of the 2,750 fake Twitter accounts created by employees at the Internet Research Agency, a “troll farm” in 
St Petersburg. Their accounts, @Jenn_Abrams and @Pamela_Moore13 have been deleted.

14 sample ads were shared, along with some of the purchasing information for each ad.

Ads and tweets for analysis

 

Background 

 

Marwick, Pariser, Phillips, and Steinem 

 

 

Varieties of Social Media Activism

 

 

Steinem & Einstein 

Steinem

  1. What are complementary copy, supportive editorial atmosphere, insertion orders (177a) and advertorials?
  2. Have you encountered these concepts before? Were you aware of these practices? How?
  3.  According to Steinem, how does advertising influence women’s magazines?
  4. What is her problem? Why does she suggest the things described are problems? Why is it a problem? What are the effects?
  5. Steinem hints that the history of women’s magazines partially explains why they became “catalogues” and “cash cows.” What is her argument?
  6.  Steinem claims most of the content in women’s magazines is disguised advertising. Is this still true?
  7. To what extent do the dynamics Steinem describes exist today? How are things different?
  8. What is most/least persuasive about Steinem’s argument?

Einstein

  1. Had you ever heard of native advertising?
  2. Einstein lists 6 types of native advertising. What are they?
  3. What is her problem? Why does she suggest the things described are problems? Why is it a problem? What are the effects?
    (e.g. Einstein cites a study (106) suggesting only 6% of readers can recognize content as advertising, and another study suggesting that even when content is labeled advertising, just over 50% thought it was written by a journalist or were unsure who wrote it.)
  4. Einstein poses a series of questions at the bottom of page 79. What are her answers? Do you agree?
  5. What do you notice about her tone? How does it compare to Steinem’s?
  6. What connections do you see between Steinem and Einstein?

 

Phillips

Examples of trolling, you've read about, heard of, or experienced?
What are the charateristics of trolling?

is there a "rhetoric of trolling"?

What might be some causes of trolling?
How does Phillips define trolling, and how does she invite us to understand trolling?

Who does she say trolls usually target, and what does that tell us?

 

 

Books for Review

Routledge has a series called Linguistics in the Digital Age. You could review one of these texts, examining it in terms of its relevance
to rhetoric and writing studies.  

 

Boyd and the Issue of Critical Digital Literacy 

  1. https://www.acpeds.org/
  2. https://www.aap.org/en-us/Pages/Default.aspx
  3. Natural news on Google's quantum computing breakthrough 
  4. https://www.naturalnews.com/About.html
  5. https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/
  6. https://securityequifax2017.com 
  7. Amnesty Plans 

 

Some Resources 

 

 

Background on Boyd & her book

 

Videos of Boyd and other Writers discussing Digital Natives

 

 

 

Alt Right & AntiFa: Rhetorical Self Fashioning Online

 

 

Possible project topics 
How are people persuaded to join extremists groups? 
3 mins  http://www.pbs.org/wnet/amanpour-and-company/video/former-neo-nazi-christian-picciolini-on-radicalization/ 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hS_hVIUsniQ 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VM6HZqQKhok 

Jimmy Kimmel SILLY THREAT https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufW8G7TVpwA   3.23

 

PROPAGANDA 

https://www.washingtonian.com/2019/05/05/what-happened-after-my-13-year-old-son-joined-the-alt-right/

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326583846_Disguised_Propaganda_from_Digital_to_Social_Media   

http://newtontechfordev.com/newton-tech4dev-research-identifies-ad-pr-executives-chief-architects-fake-news-production-social-media-trolling/  

https://datasociety.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/DS_Digital_Influence_Machine.pdf  

https://disinformationindex.org/research/  

https://disinformationindex.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GDI_Adverserial-Narratives_Report_V6.pdf

  

  

 

Fake News Redux

 

2016 Stanford Study of News Evaluation

Stanford Study - recently came out. Suggests young people have very little ability to evaluate fake news.

https://ed.stanford.edu/news/stanford-researchers-find-students-have-trouble-judging-credibility-information-online 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/22/503052574/stanford-study-finds-most-students-vulnerable-to-fake-news 

The study: https://sheg.stanford.edu/upload/V3LessonPlans/Executive%20Summary%2011.21.16.pdf 

 

Where people are getting their news: https://www.fastcompany.com/3065580/how-we-got-to-post-truth

 

More Fake News Controversies Emerge - Pizzagate

One of the fake stories we looked at which was widely shared (the one claiming Clinton operated a child sex ring) caused a man to burst into a 

Pizza store with an assault rifle and fire at least one round.  

 

Background: "Pizzagate" - fake story claiming hacked emails show child sex ring operating out of Pizza parlor that sometimes hosted dinners for democratic party leaders.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/21/technology/fact-check-this-pizzeria-is-not-a-child-trafficking-site.html 

The story December 05, 2016. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/05/us/pizzagate-comet-ping-pong-edgar-maddison-welch.html 

"After weeks of debate about the theoretical and abstract dangers of fake news, there’s finally a concrete incident to discuss. On Sunday, a North Carolina man walked into Comet Ping Pong, a pizzeria in an affluent corner of Northwest D.C. wielding an assault rifle, which he fired at least once."

 

Alarmingly a related story was retweeted by General Flynn (likely National Security adviser). Worse yet, his son, and chief of staff retweeted the fake Pizza story yesterday even after the violent incident in Washington D.C.:  and this was retweeted 1.8 million times, and liked 2.5 million times. See https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/12/the-inevitability-of-more-comet-pizza-incidents/509567/  See my comment using hypothesis

This led to a twitter war between Jake Tapper of CBS news, and Flynn's son, who maintained the story was real after the shooting incident. (It also led to one of the strangest
exchanges I have seen between a chief of staff and a journalist.) 




Sample Filter Bubble on Pizzagate - video vs. print

  1. https://www.google.com/search?q=pizzagate&num=100&espv=2&source=lnms&tbm=vid&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwje6I-ZgN7QAhUHliwKHfcpC3AQ_AUICSgC&biw=1866&bih=1022&dpr=0.9
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIBZXzOp-mc half million views
    Infowars - see 1 minute in: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsX5Jc-jOU4    
  2. Compare to googling Pizzagate "all," which gives you print news 

 

 

 

Michael G Flynn🇺🇸@mflynnJR

Until #Pizzagate proven to be false, it'll remain a story. The left seems to forget #PodestaEmails and the many "coincidences" tied to it. https://twitter.com/jackposobiec/status/805559273426141184 

7:13 PM - 4 Dec 2016.

1,8731,873 Retweets

2,5202,520 likes 

 

The controversy has led to one of the strangest interchanges I have witnessed on Twitter, with Jake Tapper requesting the 
Michael Flynn provide evidence for his claims: http://www.businessinsider.com/jake-tapper-pizzagate-michael-flynn-son-2016-12 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fake News and the Challenge to Critical Digital Literacy

 

 

Post Election Discussion - Has Social Media Changed Politics?


Exercise 1: Exercise – google final election count and tell me what the top three sites are. Take a quick look at each site. Do any look more or less credible that others?
 

 

Exercise 2: In groups, examine one of the links below. Answer the following questions
A) What does the story or post say?
B) Does it seem credible? Why or why not?

C) How can you tell? What criteria or tools did you use to determine credibility?

  1. Pope Endorsement (copy saved at archive.org. Images missing. Ask students to examine links, esp."About Us" link).  Story appeared on many Facebook feeds like this
  2. Benton Strategy Group Leaked Report, "Salvage" Plan
  3. Private Email Server and Police Raid
  4. Amnesty Plans 
  5. Clinton Adviser Scandal (skim report, but look at the first 10 comments - what are they like? 
  6. Twitter post about Scandal 
  7. Election results 
  8. Now: are protests against Trump staged and full of paid protesters? Trump retweeted that this is true.
  9. BLM and Trump protests are Soros-funded hate groups designed to overthrow the US. These seem to be having an impact on groups liek the Oath keepers. Do academics need tools to track the flow, reach and distribution of such stories?
     

 

Election Rhetoric & Social Media

 

 

Videos and Articles on Election and Social Media News Sites

 

 

Do there Need to be Dramatic Changes to the Way Facebook & Social Media Operate?

 

 

 

 

 

Gladwell, Shirky, Morozov

 

 

 

Winner, Watters, Kassorla

 

Project Resources

  • New media and identity: the Selfie project,  http://www.selfieresearchers.com/ "The Selfies Research Network is an international group of academics studying the social and cultural implications of the selfie. Our membership includes teachers, students, visual artists, reporters, and others from around the globe. Our projects include publications, conference panels, gallery installations, and teaching resources regarding the politics and aesthetics of selfie culture."  See also the Rutgers Selfie Project 
  • New media and identity: a full pdf of Jill Walker Rettberg's book Seeing Ourselves Through Technology How We Use Selfies, Blogs and Wearable Devices to See and Shape Ourselves 
    This could be a great text to include in a paper, or use for a review. 
  • Rettberg on blogging as a genre and a key element of social media.  "Rettberg discusses the ways blogs are integrated into today’s mainstream social media ecology, where comments and links from Twitter and Facebook may be more important than the network between blogs that was significant five years ago, and questions the shift towards increased commercialization and corporate control of blogs. The new edition also analyses how smart phones with cameras and social media have led a shift towards more visual emphasis in blogs, with photographs and graphics increasingly foregrounded."
  • Rettberg: How snapchat uses your face 
  • Witness: "See it, Film it, Change it" A great site for those interested in how video and digital media can be used for human rights work and social justice.

 

 

 

Tools 

 

Tools for CDL 

 

Electronic Composing & Multimodal Tools

 

 

Thompson ("So Digitally Close") Watters, Watts & Boyd

 

 

Discussion Questions - Young & Sullivan

  1. Scholarly research typically involves situating your contribution in relation to other research, and showing there is some shortcoming, limitation or weakness in some of the existing research. (This is a move that can drive your final paper. For example, you might want to argue that Thompson, and writers like him, bring attention to something new and important. we have entered age of mass writing, user generated content, has much potential - for literacy, spread of ideas, improving our thinking, perhaps even participation in democracy. But - there are some limitations. A) he lumps too many different kinds of writing together (Y & S); B) he does not consider inequalities, and C) social coordination that is required. We need to do a lot to make these things happen - don't just happen by selves.) 
    Where do Young & Sullivan review previous research, where do they say this research is limited, and doesn't go far enough?  Where do they describe other research that is interesting and shows more potential? 
  2. Where do they use rebuttals, and how are they expressed?
  3. How do the authors build ethos? How would you describe their "voice" and the persona created? (Find evidence)
  4. Read the section at the end on a modern art of memory. How can we imagine such a modern art of memory? In groups, share the tools or strategies you use. Write your response on the wiki in the groups page.

 

 

 

 

CDL Links and Exercises Day 1

 

Quiz 1

  1. What is the difference between  http://accounts.bankofamerica.com and https://bankofamerica.accounts.com? OR, 
    http://www.ebay.deals.com versus http://www.ebay.com/electronics/ipad 
    (See https://rws511.pbworks.com/w/page/84842140/Digital_Literacy#IntroductiontoURLsDomainNamesandEvaluatingWebPages)  
  2. How can you tell if any of these links lead to the sites they specify? 
  3. Why might you use quotation marks when conducting a search?
  4. URL is an acronym for…
  5. Identify three Boolean search terms.
  6. How do you find the owner or publisher of a website?
  7. Identify these extensions and what they represent  .org  .com  .sch  .k12   .edu     .gov   .ac     .net     .mil     .co
  8. How do you find out who is linked to your school’s website?
  9. What clues in a Web address might indicate you are on a personal website?
    (http://web.archive.org/web/20041012180151/pubweb.northwestern.edu/~abutz/di/intro.html 
  10. How would you conduct a search for the following: a list of Web sites of all the academic institutions in South Africa? (Hint: South Africa’s country code is .za)
  11. How do you find the history of any given website?
  12. How would you conduct a search for the following: US higher education websites that contain the word turtle?
  13. How do you get to the advanced google search page, and how do you find google scholar? 
  14. Do you know how to  track the companies that are tracking you when you go to a page? (ghostery and collusion - tools that may be worth considering) 

 

Quiz 2

Researching Martin Luther King - you'd think this would be an easy process. But the first entry is wikipedia, and many students avoid that. The third most commonly returned 
site on the major search engines is martinlutherking dot org (I don't want to put the actual link). 

 

  1. Go to martinlutherking dot org.  What do you make of the site - what kind of site is it?
  2. How can you tell who created it?
  3. What do you learn from examining the sites that link to it? 
  4. What do you make of these two sites, both of which support academic online communities of a sort? 
    http://crookedtimber.org/
    http://www.linguistlist.org/ 
     

Quiz 3

  1. Do you know (or can you find out) how to search by filetype, site type, domain name, or date range?
  2. Can you find out how to search on pages that link to a site, pages that are similar to one you like or wish to use as a reference point? 
    What value might there be in such searches? Can you imagine a context or reason to undertake such a search? 
  3. Can you find a cached copy of a page (useful when the search results show your item should be there, but it's been revised and is not there when you get to the page) 

    (You may find Bob Flisser's Search Tips page useful. The page on digital literacy on this site has some search tips. Also, there is a web extension for search that may be useful, http://tinyurl.com/n99c8zq)

 

 

Some Search Concerns

  1. Study Suggests That Google Has Its Thumb on Scale in Search http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/30/business/study-suggests-that-google-has-its-thumb-on-scale-in-search.html 
  2. Yes, Google Manipulated Its Search Results. It’s Probably Allowed To. http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2015/03/20/google_manipulated_its_search_results_the_first_amendment_protects_that.html

 

 

 

Provisional Framework for Critical Digital Literacy

  1.  Contextual & Rhetorical Knowledge
  2.  Search (technical, cultural, rhetorical - includes social search)
  3.  Annotation
  4.  Curation – archive, store, tag, retrieve
  5.  Reflect, analyze and critique (again, mix of technical, cultural, rhetorical and interpretation)
  6.  Produce and remix
  7.  Network and collaborate
  8.  Rhetorical analysis of narratives, tropes and ideologies that digital technologies are imbricated in
  9.  Creating a PLN and participating in a "ecosystem" that is socialn individual (personalized) and established via practice and discipline 

 

 

 

Political Rhetoric, Demagoguery, and New  Media 

 

 

"Micro" Social Networks

  • Finstagram: "...finstagram accounts allow you to screen your followers; no one can follow you without your permission. “You follow them first — that’s how you alert people that it’s there,” said Dominique Escandon, 18, a student at Carnegie Mellon University who has more than 370 followers on her main account and 33 on her pseudonymous one. “You tend to follow your best friends.” Keeping the numbers low encourages conversation and ensures that a post meant in jest won’t serve as fodder for trolls. 
  • Nextdoor.com: "Nextdoor is a social networking service for neighborhoods in the United States. It allows users to connect with people who live in their neighborhood and nearby neighborhoods. Nextdoor competes with other social networks such as YelpYahoo GroupsFacebook and Google. It differentiates itself by limiting access to posts to the people in each neighborhood or those nearby, which can increase privacy.[2][3] It has been characterized by The Washington Post as part of a wave of community focus in the United States."

 

 

 

Goffman & Gender

Questions About Codes of Gender

  1. What is Jhally’s problem? Why should we care about the codes of gender? What is at stake?
  2. What use is Jhally’s analysis – what can we use it to do, know, reflect on, create, etc?
  3. Made in 2009, so 10 years old. Does any of it seem out of date?
  4. Since Jhally made the documentary, we have seen an explosion of user generated images and texts on social media Do you think this has produced different “codes,” different patterns for representing gender, or are we seeing a remix that uses many older codes in both traditional and new ways?
  5. Jhally says ways of representing masculine and feminine are too restrictive, and the dominant cultural ideals tend to privilege masculinity. To what extent do you agree?  
  6. Can you think of other ways of interpreting the many body positions Jhally describes in ads. That is, can you imagine replying, “yes, but,” or even “no, I think you have it quite wrong when you talk about X.”
  7. What do you make of Jhally’s idea of power and domination. Do the positions women are shown taking all represent subordination?
  8. Do you see any of these patterns in the images you and your friends share? Do you see some kind of reaction against these codes?
  9. Do you see these patterns in the media you consume?

 

 

Using Jhally/Goffman to Examine Magazines and Sites

 

1. MAXIM MAN https://www.maxim.com/maxim-man

The “Maxim Man” page is full of topics of interest to men.  Look at images of men and women. What patterns do you see? Do they mirror, extend, or complicate Goffman’s ideas?

 

2. 'MAXIM COVER GIRL' COMPETITION FINALISTS

https://www.maxim.com/women/maxim-cover-girl-competition-finalists-2019-11

What patterns do you see? Do they mirror, extend, or complicate Goffman’s ideas?

 

3. Magazine of Your Choice (try to find one with images and ads).

Look at images of men and women. What patterns do you see? Do they mirror, extend, or complicate Goffman’s ideas?

How are men and women shown together? Are some females in certain professions represented differently? Are there genres of women, and activities? (If can’t find one, perhaps use https://people.com/)

 

4. COMPARE COSMO COVERS OVER TIME
This google image search shows Cosmo cover pages over time. What patterns to you see?

 

5. EXAMINE MEN’S HEALTH MAGAZINE COVERS OVER TIME

This google image search shows Men's Health cover pages over time. What patterns to you see?

 

6. EXAMINE (AND COMPARE) WOMEN'S HEALTH MAGAZINE COVERS OVER TIME

This google image search shows Women's Health cover pages over time. What patterns to you see?

 

7. TOP FEMALE INSTAGRAM MODELS – what are patterns?  Do they mirror, extend, or complicate Goffman’s ideas?

https://influencermarketinghub.com/top-instagram-models/


8. MALE INSTAGRAM MODELS - – what are patterns? Do they mirror, extend, or complicate Goffman’s ideas?

https://www.gq.com/story/the-20-hottest-male-models-on-instagram-right-now

 

9. Gay models in Out Magazine https://www.out.com/male-models

Do they mirror, extend, or complicate Goffman’s ideas?

 

Friends and the "Salmon" shirt

3. Why might you use quotation marks when conducting a search?

4. URL is an acronym for…

5. Identify three Boolean search terms.

6. How do you find the owner or publisher of a website?

7. Identify these extensions and what they represent:
.org     .com     .sch     .k12     .edu     .gov     .ac     .net     .mil     .co

8. How do you find out who is linked to your school’s website?

9. What clues in a Web address might indicate you are on a personal website?

10. How would you conduct a search for the following: a list of Web sites of all the academic institutions in South Africa? (Hint: South Africa’s country code is .za)

11. How do you find the history of any given website?

12. How would you conduct a search for the following: US higher education websites that contain the word turtle?

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